devildoll

busket:

mybodythehandgrenade:

brinconvenient:

tonidorsay:

gailsimone:

chrishaley:

Done and done.

(Not pictured: “Butt window”, but trust me, it’s there.)

You have no idea how much this cheered me up just now.

Bwahahahahahaha

I for one, think this is a major improvement. Look how empowered he is! And it’s relevant to the character as someone who is powered by the sun, he’d want to maximize the amount of sunlight he receives, right? It’s not like it makes sense for him to cover himself from chin to toe.
In fact, I think some strappy sandals might be an improvement.

strappy high heeled sandals would increase his height making him closer to the sun. and if wonderwoman can fight in heels it can’t be that hard, right?

c’mon the artist could have dEFINITELY shown us the butt window too, like at the same time as a the chest window. like you just have to twist him in a way that shows us the butt but also turn the chest around a little so we see that too? superman is a tough guy im sure he can handle breaking his spine to show off all those important windows

fionagallagherrr
tranqualizer:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

and you know, shout out to our im/migrant parents who were not college educated before they came to the U.S and don’t share a narrative of going from “riches to rags.” shout out to my im/migrant parents who were laborers at home and are still laborers here.
i think it’s important to honor the complexities of our parents histories and uplift their triumphs but let’s remember to do so in a way that honors all of the ways im/migrants exist and all of the places we and our parents come from. we don’t have to prove that capitalism, white supremacy, classism, etc is awful because our parents were once revered college professors or doctors. we don’t have to believe in that assimilation. 


My father and his family came from Egypt in the 1960s and they had maids and butlers. Then here they come to Australia to nothing. Very shortly after they arrive my grandfather gets hit by a car and breaks one or both of his legs (details get muddled) and my grandmother at forty years old has to go to work to support the family for the first time in her life. Having maids to wait on you to full tine work would have been hard. Add the fact my dads older sister (14 years old at the time) knew the best English (which wasn’t even that good. I’m talking elementary foreign language) had to take over all the paying of bills, setting things up to run the house etc because, like I said she knew the best English. Imagine being 14 in a new country and having to ring people to set up electricity. Then my dad (10 years old) was put in the wrong grade because he was “dumb” (couldn’t speak English) then within two years ended up TOP of his class. I have a lot of feels about this stuff. Plus I used to work with refugees. And it’s true. Most of them were highly educated but can’t find work in Australia except in taxis or shops. Like fuck that. Anyone says anything about refugees in my earshot. I will fight you.

tranqualizer:

mayosjustanickname:

diasporicdecay:

pocketostars:

ancientrelic:

humansofnewyork:

“After this I go to work at a pizza shop. My wife and I were college professors in Bangladesh. I taught accounting. But one dollar in America becomes eighty dollars when we send it back home.”

People forget, when immigrants come to this country they start from scratch. They could have been lawyers in their home country, but in the US..it means nothing. You think a HS diploma from Bangladesh means anything in this country? My mom was a top student in the country, went to all the best school and got the best of everything…but when she got here it meant squat and she was cleaning other people’s homes and scrubbing their toilets. This is why I get pissed of when people talk smack about immigrants. They at least are doing something…..heading for a goal..making sacrifices…what are you doing with your life? 

^ My parents were college-educated teachers in their home country and came to the U.S. with nothing but empty pockets, a dash of hope, and a belief in God. They also scrubbed toilets in people’s homes to make enough to provide for their children, and that’s probably not something a lot of educated professionals would be able to do. I know I wouldn’t be able to do it. Pride would get in the way.

THIS IS TOO IMPORTANT.

Shoutout to my parents

and you know, shout out to our im/migrant parents who were not college educated before they came to the U.S and don’t share a narrative of going from “riches to rags.” shout out to my im/migrant parents who were laborers at home and are still laborers here.

i think it’s important to honor the complexities of our parents histories and uplift their triumphs but let’s remember to do so in a way that honors all of the ways im/migrants exist and all of the places we and our parents come from. we don’t have to prove that capitalism, white supremacy, classism, etc is awful because our parents were once revered college professors or doctors. we don’t have to believe in that assimilation. 

My father and his family came from Egypt in the 1960s and they had maids and butlers. Then here they come to Australia to nothing. Very shortly after they arrive my grandfather gets hit by a car and breaks one or both of his legs (details get muddled) and my grandmother at forty years old has to go to work to support the family for the first time in her life. Having maids to wait on you to full tine work would have been hard.

Add the fact my dads older sister (14 years old at the time) knew the best English (which wasn’t even that good. I’m talking elementary foreign language) had to take over all the paying of bills, setting things up to run the house etc because, like I said she knew the best English. Imagine being 14 in a new country and having to ring people to set up electricity.

Then my dad (10 years old) was put in the wrong grade because he was “dumb” (couldn’t speak English) then within two years ended up TOP of his class. I have a lot of feels about this stuff.

Plus I used to work with refugees. And it’s true. Most of them were highly educated but can’t find work in Australia except in taxis or shops. Like fuck that.

Anyone says anything about refugees in my earshot. I will fight you.